Child Care Search


Search for a Child Care Provider

With the vision of being a network of support to make Randolph County a better community for EVERY child, the Randolph County Partnership for Children’s Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) provides support services throughout the county. The Regional CCR&R educates and refers parents to a range of child care options. Click here to access the referral service or complete an online inquiry form to start the enrollment process. You may also call 336-369-5097 or 1-800-289-5098 to speak with a Child Care Parent Counselor at Guilford Child Development from 8 am – 5 pm, Monday through Friday.

Qualified parents and caregivers also have the option of applying to place their children into state-funded NC Pre-K classrooms, as well as private for-profit child care centers that have been approved by the state to host an NC Pre-K program. Click here for more information or call our Program Assistant, Wendy Tellez, at 629-2128 ext. 27 for more information on the NC Pre-K program in Randolph County. 

In addition, the North Carolina Division of Child Development, a division of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, has a search feature on their website that allows you to search for child care center information. Click here to access this website – the search feature is located in the upper left hand corner of the home page (beneath the DHHS logo).

In North Carolina and in Randolph County, there are a variety of child care options available for young children and their families. Licensed care is available both in child care centers and in family child care homes. Centers and homes that are licensed are regulated by the North Carolina Division of Child Development.

Some forms of child care are not regulated by the North Carolina Division of Child Development . Some half-day or “Mother’s Morning Out” child care programs, which often are housed in churches, are not licensed (although there are many religiously-affiliated child care programs that are licensed) because they provide services for less than four hours per day. Other examples of care that is not licensed are “babysitters,” nannies, au pairs, and other private care arrangements.

Whether or not the child care setting you choose is licensed, the information provided here regarding quality child care still applies. Even those parents who choose five-star centers or homes for their children should be aware of these markers of quality to ensure that they are informed consumers of child care. If you’d like to find a licensed program for your child, the North Carolina Star-Rated Licensing System can be helpful to compare the quality of different child care settings. This system is explained in the next section.


The Importance of Quality Early Care

As a concerned parent, you want the best for your child. You want a child care provider who nurtures your child and supports his or her growth as a whole person—socially, emotionally, physically, and cognitively. But did you know that children’s experiences during the first five years of life shape their brain development for years to come?

What we know about early care and education has changed considerably in recent years. In some cases, what was once commonplace is no longer considered acceptable for young children’s care and education. This resource is intended to serve as a guide for parents seeking quality care for their children. When parents educate themselves about quality child care and refuse to accept “less than the very best” for their children, the overall quality of child care in Randolph County will improve dramatically.


How to Select Quality Care

Selecting a child care setting for your child can seem overwhelming at first. There are many options available, and it’s difficult to decide among them. The following three steps can assist you in selecting a quality child care setting for your child.

The Initial Search
If you would like assistance finding child care in Randolph County, the Partnership is ready to assist you. Call 336-629-2128, ext. 11.

You can also utilize a search tool to find a child care center or family child care home that is regulated by the NC Division of Child Development. Click here to use the search tool provided on the NC Division of Child Development’s website to help you locate programs by location, star license level, or other criteria.

The First Phone Call
After you’ve developed a manageable list of child care options from your initial search, contacting child care settings by phone to learn more about what they offer is the next step. Following are some sample questions for this initial phone call:

  • Does the child care setting have space available for your child?
  • What are the child care setting’s fees, and what do they include?
  • Examples of types of fees are one-time registration fees, one-time or periodic activity fees, and tuition fees. Also check if lunches and snacks are provided, or whether you’d be expected to pack food for your child each day.
  • What are the hours of the child care setting?
  • If you prefer part-day care or care for only a few days per week, some child care settings may work with you on reduced rates. Church preschools also often offer half-day programs and/or choices among two, three, or five days per week.
  • What ages are the children in the child care setting?
  • If you are a parent of an infant and a preschooler, think about whether you’d like your children to be in the same or different child care settings. Some child care settings specialize in care for infants and toddlers, while others specialize in care for preschool-age children (three and four years of age). Still others serve children 6 weeks to preschool age. Many others also provide school-age care.
  • How many children—and how many teachers—are in the room where your child would be?
  • Also check about the maximum number of children the child care setting would enroll in that room, and how many teachers would be with the group in that case. Ensure that these numbers adhere to NC’s minimum licensing requirements at least.
  • (If applicable) What is the star rating?
  • What is the education level and experience of those providing care?


The Visit

After calling the child care settings to gather additional information about their program, schedule a visit to the child care settings you’re still considering. Try to schedule a time for you and your child to visit the setting together for at least an hour and a half during the morning, since this is the time of day that typically is most structured. Scheduling a visit rather than just showing up will ensure that someone will be available to provide you with a tour of the child care setting and answer any questions you have. To get a sense of important indicators of quality to observe on your visit, read the section below, What Am I Looking For?


What Am I Looking For? The Indicators of Quality Care

As a parent who may have had little experience with child care in the past, it can be difficult to know what the indicators of quality care are. Below is some basic information about quality child care programming, which is at the heart of every quality early childhood program. Programming includes such crucial elements of quality care as low ratios and group sizes; a child-directed curriculum; a predictable daily schedule; individualized care; and developmentally-appropriate expectations.

Ratios and group sizes
The NC Division of Child Development has established minimum requirements for ratios and groups sizes. The appropriate ratio and size for a group is determined by the age of the youngest child in the group, and child care programs are required to adhere to these minimum group sizes and ratios at all times. Remember, these are minimum requirements, and centers and homes that have lower ratios and group sizes are demonstrating their commitment to quality care. Below is a grid showing ratio and group size recommendations according to various well-respected sources. The far right columns are recommendations of T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. , a nationally recognized pediatrician and author of a number of books on child development and parenting.

 

 NC Minimum

Requirements 

 NC Higher

Standards 

NAEYC

Recommendation 

Brazelton

Recommendation 

Age

Ratio

Group

Ratio

Group

Ratio

Group

Ratio

0-1 yr

1:5

10

1:5

10

1:4

8

1:3

1-2 yrs

1:6

12

1:6

12

1:4

12

1:3-4

2-3 yrs

1:10

20

1:9

20

1:6

12

1:4

3-4 yrs

1:15

25

1:10

25

1:10

20

1:7

4-5 yrs

1:20

25

1:13

25

1:10

20

1:8

A child-directed curriculum
Quality early childhood programs “follow children’s lead,” both in how children experience classroom activities every day and in how activities are planned from one week to the next. A child’s desire to move from one interest center to another throughout the day is respected and understood as valuable to that child’s learning and development (rather than controlling children’s time in centers or herding them from one center to the next). Observant teachers learn about the children’s interests through children’s conversations and play, and include these interests in planned events for the future.

A predictable daily schedule
Children feel most secure and are best-equipped to manage their own behavior when a predictable daily routine has been developed, and is adhered to on a daily basis. When television or watching videos is provided at all in child care settings, it should be one of several choices; offered once per week or less often; offered for no longer than 20 to 30 minutes at a time; and limited to educational programs or other G-rated programs.

Individualized care
One-on-one experiences with caregivers are important ways for children of all ages to learn about themselves. Daily routines—such as feeding, toileting, and sleeping—offer excellent opportunities for such experiences, and can be times for warm interactions and learning. For infants, one example of individualized care is ensuring that they are held for bottle-feeding, rather than having bottles “propped.” As children age and learn to do more for themselves, such one-on-one experiences remain important parts of every day. Children’s individual needs—to use the bathroom, for example—should be respected. Meals and snacks can be times for conversation, learning about different kinds of foods, and gaining experience serving oneself. A nap or rest period can be a time to offer individualized comfort to a child as she tries to sleep in an environment other than her own bed. For the child who doesn’t nap but rests for a short period instead, a teacher can use the time before the other children awaken as valuable one-on-one time for reading or other quiet activities.

Developmentally-appropriate expectations
Understanding child development can help adults develop realistic expectations of children of different ages. Often when adults consider a child to be “misbehaving,” it’s actually the case that unrealistic demands are being placed on the child. In a child’s everyday life outside of child care, situations sometimes occur that are difficult for children of certain ages to handle—at such times, adults do the best they can to help the child. In quality child care settings, the focus is on the children, and events are well-controlled to ensure that expectations of children are realistic, which means it’s more likely that children will be able to manage their behavior successfully. Circumstances when unrealistic expectations of children are made (such as expecting children to wait for more minutes than they are years old—one minute for ones, two minutes for twos, etc.—with no “wait-time activity” like singing or playing follow-the-leader) should be rare in child care settings. When children are engaged in activity, they are unlikely to misbehave—after all, they already have something to do!

Trust your instincts
In addition to these important quality indicators, trust your instincts. If there is something that makes you uncomfortable about a particular child care setting—even if you don’t quite know what it is—it’s best to pursue a different child care setting.

Helpful links


The NC Star-Rated Licensing System

In North Carolina, there are two systems for regulating child care centers. The NC Star-Rated Licensing System is the way most child care centers—and all licensed family child care homes—in North Carolina are regulated. This system provides for child care centers and homes to earn one through five stars based on performance in three areas: Program Standards, Staff Education, and Compliance History. Centers and homes can earn one through five points in each of these three areas, up to a total of 15 possible points. All centers and homes complying with minimum NC licensing requirements are awarded one star. Applying for additional stars is optional, and the owners of some centers and homes choose not to do so.

North Carolina is transitioning to a two-component system by January 2008. The compliance history will become a standard requirement, with program standards and staff education remaining as the two components.

The NC Division of Child Development (NC DCD) requires that centers and homes are visited at least once a year by a Licensing Consultant with the NC DCD. Additionally, centers and homes must reapply for star licensure every three years. When centers and homes reapply for star licensure, they may earn more or fewer points in each of the three areas described above, which may impact the star rating—either by increasing or decreasing it.

The other type of licensing in North Carolina is the G.S. 110-106 Notice of Compliance from the NC DCD, which is available for church child care centers only. For this type of licensing, child care centers are not required to comply with certain DCD rules about age-appropriate activities for children, staff qualifications, and staff training requirements.

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The Cost of Quality Child Care

A common complaint among today’s parents is the high cost of child care. Even programs meeting only minimum licensing requirements can be costly to working families. The cost of care in a five-star center from the time a child is six weeks old until she enters kindergarten could be $57,000 or higher—compared to only about $19,000 for tuition, books, fees, and supplies for an undergraduate degree at NC State or UNC-Chapel Hill. That means it’s three times as expensive for families to use center-based child care for one child as it is to support a son or daughter in college!

In light of the high cost of quality child care, it might be helpful to understand some factors impacting the high cost of quality early care and education.

  • Low ratios and group sizes mean more staff and attention for each child, which supports children’s optimal development.
  • Appropriate salaries and benefits to early childhood professionals is an important means of recognizing the professional nature of the important work they do. More educated workers are compensated at higher rates than workers with less education and help minimize teacher turnover—which certainly is impacted by low salaries and insufficient or absent benefits for child care professionals.


Financial Assistance

Just as there is financial assistance available for families to support their children in college, there is assistance for families to help with the costs of child care. The Child Care Scholarship Program, managed through Randolph County Department of Social Services and funded by the Randolph County Partnership for Children and offers financial assistance for the cost of child care tuition for eligible families. A child care scholarship can be used at licensed child care centers and family child care homes, approved non-licensed homes, and approved religious sponsored programs. Contact the Department of Social Services at 683-8000 (Asheboro), 315-8000 (Liberty) or 878-8000 (Archdale/Trinity) to find out if you qualify for assistance. Sometimes, child care settings offer their own forms of scholarship for working families who are not eligible for scholarships through these agencies. Inquiring directly at the child care setting is the best way to learn about such programs.

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